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Building a 19th Century-style Parlor Guitar, Part 2 – the Body by Jason Stamper

With the neck and headstock roughed out I moved on to making the body of the guitar.

The first thing I did was to plane the material down to the correct thickness on my thickness planer. Then I joined the top and back pieces up. I did this by putting a ruler under the joint on a piece of plywood and then clamping the outside edges down...

 
 

Building a Saw Till by Jeff Strickland

I finally decided that hanging all my saws from two hooks on the wall wasn't good enough any more, so I started on a saw till.

Material is all Southern Yellow Pine from HD and I have decided that it will be 100% hand cut everything (I usually cave in and use the TS for rip cuts and cleaning up the ends).

Last night I got the basic shape done...

 
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Restoring a Spear & Jackson Backsaw by Ethan Sincox

I tend to live life a bit on the dangerous side. I drink milk without looking at the expiration date. I drive until my car’s mileage calculator says I can go a distance of zero miles on the current tank of gas.

And sometimes I remove split nuts from my backsaws. I picked up this Spear & Jackson backsaw off of our favorite auction website about a year or so ago. I honestly don’t remember why I bought it;...

 

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John Sorby & Sons

John Sorby & Sons became one of the most famous firms making sheep shears and woodworking augers for shipwrights in first part of 19th Century. The designs of these tools were patented.

In 1844, Lockwood Brothers acquired John Sorby & Sons and continued to use their trade mark, name and factory at Spital Hill Works. They capitalized on John Sorby & Sons' fame to the fullest.

 

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E. C. Atkins No. 53 Skew Back 26" - 10 PPI Hand Saw by Daryl Weir

Here's a nice example of a late 1910 era Atkins "SILVER STEEL" No.53. It's a cross cut hand saw, filed at 10ppi, with the blade being 26" long.

As you would expect, it has the embossed apple "Perfection" handle which Atkins started using, instead of the carved handle, around 1912. Most of the Atkins saws were known for a light etch and this one holds true to that rule.

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Big Ripsaw and Crosscut Saw Project by Dominic Greco

I wanted to build a full sized rip and crosscut saws for a while now. Until recently I didn't have access to large widths of 0.042" steel. But that changed and I was ready to work.

Along with that steel I also picked up a Beverly Slitting Shear. This little gem allows me to cut spring steel like it was paper. Now that all the pieces were in place I decided it was time to layout a rip and cross cut saw prototype.

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Building a Minstrel Banjo by Jason Stamper

A few years ago I was camping with a friend of mine and he brought his minstrel banjo. After getting to play it I knew I had to have one, but funds were short.

So being the practical one, I decided to make one. My friend said I was nuts for trying since I could buy one for $200, but I decided to forge ahead anyway.

What is a minstrel banjo you ask? It might be more appropriate to label it as an early banjo.

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Plane Maker’s Bed Float Reproduction by Jim Hendricks

Part war of attrition… part friendship… and mostly encouragement was all I needed to get my backside out into the shop again and make a prototype tool… as “suggested” by a very good friend of mine… Toby Nava.

So having absolutely no idea where to start… a few more head scratchings and observations of other fine tools led me to make one…

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The Plot Thickens – The Berg Hand Tools Revisited by Kim Malmberg

I have written several stories about the Erik Anton Berg manufacturing company. Mostly I have been engaged in trying to date company line of tools depending on stamps and logotypes.

Much new and hard evidence had surfaced since the previous stories, which has effectively crushed several loose theories.

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Hand Plane Basics - part 1 by Bill Rittner

I am often asked how to get started using handplanes. So, here goes. I chose the plane pictured below for this article because it is common and inexpensive.

It is a modern Stanley #5 jack plane made in England. I bought it at a flea market for $7. My purpose is to show you that just about any plane can be made to work well with some knowledge and work.

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Making the Ron Herman's Sawbench by Naveen Gogineni

The first time I ever heard of a saw bench was from a Chris Schwarz article on Popular Woodworking.

The one in the pdf in the article was an intimidating one for me because of the mortise & tenon joints etc.

After doing a bunch of research I came across another saw bench, again by C. S., but with "easier" joints.

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Sorby: A Famous Sheffield Tool Making Family by Geoffrey Tweedale

‘SORBY’ is a well-known name in Sheffield tool and cutlery manufacture.

The family was an old one, whose members became prominent in the town’s affairs as magistrates and local government officials. The first Master Cutler (the head of the local craft guild) in 1624 was Robert Soresby (the name has had various spellings).

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Warran & Ted demands some respect - II by Kim Malmberg

This is a Warranted Superior hand saw. Nevertheless I will boldly state that it is one of the finest saws I have ever come across.

I cannot confirm the maker with absolute certainty, but the saw features a Warranted Superior medallion with the Disston keystone, so I’d be surprised if it was made by any other company.

 

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Isaac Youngs Wall Clock by Will Myers

The Isaac Youngs wall clock is a decidedly timeless piece.

The original clock, made by Youngs in the 1840 is in the collection of Hancock Shaker Village, Hancock Mass.

Even though time seems to be my worst enemy these days, I thought I would have a go at making one.

 

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Rumors, Facts and the Future... by Wiktor Kuc

I rarely post any "Editorial Note" or "Letter from the Editor" here. The site is informal and I focus primarily on content. However, there is something that needs a few words.

Many of you noticed that there are changes occurring in the "Contributors" menu. Some familiar names are replaced with new ones and an additional page - "Other Contributors" - was added. Yes, I am making small changes to the website...

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A Little Less New...


Recent Articles


 

Latest Downloads


Rosewood Tote Repair Step by Step by Dominic Greco

James Howarth & Sons Ltd. by Geoffrey Tweedale

Make a Tote by Bill Rittner

Spot the Fake by Kim Malmberg

Reviving a Traditional Tool Chest by Jason Stamper

Notes on the Roubo Bookstand by Jim Harvey

Disston No. 77 Backsaw by Daryl Weir

Rinehart Museum Auction Yields Patented Saw from Alton, Illinois by Mike Urness

Re-cutting and Re-sizing Saw Teeth with Paul Sellers

Testing the “Richard Tomes” Memorial Infill Panel Plane by Jim Hendricks

Fitting a Tang Chisel in a Handle with Paul Sellers

Building a 19th Century-style Parlor Guitar by Jason Stamper

Warran & Ted Demands Some Respect by Kim Malmberg

 

1938 - Marples "Shamrock Brand" Tools Catalog - Wm Marples & Sons

1906 - Tools for Machinists and Woodworkers by Joseph G. Horner

1892 - Modern Machine-Shop Practice by Joshua Rose

1907 - Prectical Carpentry - Vol. 1 & Vol. 2 by William A. Radford

1925 - "Yankee" Tools Brochure

1941 - American Swiss Pattern Files of Precision catalog

1892 - The Slojd System of Woodworking by B. B. Hoffman, A. B.

1904 - The Teacher's Hand-book of Slojd by Otto Salomon

1918 - Disston Catalog and Price List

1937 - Saw Efficiency by Ohlen-Bishop Company

1913 - Carpenters' Tools - Catalog and Price List by The L. & I. L. White Co.

1909 - Edge Tools - Catalog and Price List - The L. & I. L. White Co.


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