A Traditional Tool Chest in Two Days with Christopher Schwarz DVD

A Traditional Tool Chest in Two Days with Christopher Schwarz DVD

$22.49

Woodworkers who use traditional tool chests swear they're the most convenient way to organize tools for work in their...[Read More]
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Sharpen Your Handsaws

Sharpen Your Handsaws

$24.99

Anyone can Sharpen a Saw Learn secrets to sharpening backsaws & handsaws Discover the truth about shaping and set Cut...[Read More]

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A Winchester Desk: Joinery Inside & Out

A Winchester Desk: Joinery Inside & Out

$22.49

Secrets from the Past Revealed Learn the how and why of secret compartments. Understand the joinery used to build classic...[Read More]
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Blacksmithing for Woodworkers: Forging a Custom Hinge DVD

Blacksmithing for Woodworkers: Forging a Custom Hinge DVD

$17.99

Don't settle for standard, store-bought hardware for you next woodworking project. Make your own by following the clear...[Read More]
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A Cabinetmaker's Notebook
A CabMaker's Notebook
$21.95
A well known work by Krenov, this is the first in a series of four books written about the art and craft of cabinetmaking....[Read More]
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Build a Custom Backsaw DVD with Matt Cianci

Build a Custom Backsaw DVD with Matt Cianci

$24.99

Create your own custom backsaw with Matt Cianci Backsaws should be very personal tools, so building your own custom...[Read More]
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What's New...


   
 
     
 

Greyhound Hand Saws - The National Builder, 1909

To an ordinary person, selecting a hand saw seems an easy thing. Almost anything in the shape of a saw and having teeth that look sharp enough to cut would be taken. But to the carpenter, a saw is a mighty important item in his tool box.

In making his first selection he often goes by the experience of his father or brother or ...

   

Modifying a Stanley 151 Spokeshave by Will Myers

On a recent project I realized I needed a better spokeshave for concave surfaces.

The one I have been using is a small wooden bodied shave that works well but is hard to get it to cut fine enough for close work.
I have several Stanley 151 and 152 shaves and really like the screw adjustment ...

 
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1865 - Henry Disston No. 7 - 18” Panel Saw by Bob Garay

 Here is a little treasure I got this past weekend at the flea market. It is an 1865 Henry Disston No. 7 - 18” panel saw with marked 12ppi.

Now this is a rare saw but a couple of things that make it even scarcer. It is a Henry Disston saw with an etch. He started etching his saws in 1865 yet his son Hamilton also joined the company that year.

Full Story>>

The Marking Gauge - Woodworking for Home Students by Chelsea C. Fraser

 Marking gauges are small tools of the craft used for running outlines, and other lines on stock, to which cutting tools are to work.

In order to produce such lines, whether straight or curved, the edge of the stock from which they are guided must be of the same contour, and should be perfectly...

Full Story>>

Winslow's Adjustable Face Marking Gauge - Carpentry & Building, 1903

A tool which is intended for gauging convex and concave as well as straight work, and known as Winslow's Adjustable Face Marking Gauge, is being introduced to the trade by the Mossberg Wrench Company of Central Falls, Rhode Island.

Full Story>>

Building a Twist-Lock Marking Gauge by Jim Hendricks

Recently I received a beautiful old rosewood twist-lock marking gauge. I thought that this would make a superb tool to build. Something simple, yet deceptively clever.

First we will discuss stock selection, show how the original was measured and how these dimensions are transferred to the raw stock.

Full Story>>

Drill Chuck - Machinery magazine, November, 1911

Thomas J. Fegley and George O. Leopold in U. S. patent No. 932,259 (Aug. 24, 1909), assigned to North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. Pa., describe a simple and cheap chuck that will readily and firmly grasp a drill or other tool.

A longitudinal section is shown in Fig. 1 and a perspective view of one of the jaws in Fig. 2.

Full Story>>

An Accurate Birmingham Wire Gauge - American Machinist-Vol.1, Sept., 1878

 The well-known house of Henry Disston & Sons, having for many years experienced great difficulty in their business by reason of the inaccuracies of so-called standard gauges, their experience being that not one in ten could be relied upon for exactness, determined some months ago to enter upon the manufacture of gauges which their customers could rely upon as being all alike.

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Making a Basic Jewelry Box - by P. Michael Henderson

Boxes are a good woodworking project. They are good learning projects, requiring design, accuracy, and joinery - and they don't take a lot of wood.

In fact, you can often use off-cuts from other projects. And they make good gifts for family members.

Full Story>>

Experience of a Tramp Machinist in Striker’s Shop by James F. Hobart, American Machinist, 1885

 John Striker’s business was “booming.” He had orders for three new threshing engines, one water wheel, ten brick machines, and a lot of shafting.

Times were picking up, men getting scarce, and good hard to get. One day a chap walked in and wanted a job.

Full Story>>

Dovetail Joints - Manufacturer and Builder, 1865

The strongest and most permanent joint made in carpentry and cabinet-making, where pieces of wood are fastened together at right angles, is the dovetail.

When made in some of its most approved and perfected forms, it is equal in neatness and artistic finish to the miter joint.

Full Story>>

The Fantastic Fray by Jason Stamper

 In the continuing series on the lot of bit braces I acquired a few years ago I am going to tell you about the awesome Fray brace.

John S. Fray began manufacturing his braces in partnership with Horace Pigg. You may occasionally find one marked Fray & Pigg as in this example I have.

Full Story>>

Brace Yourselves! - part 5 by Jim Hendricks

There is a devil with tail involved in the spinning of the rear handle. The lathe is best tool for the job in this case but the rest was definitely all by hand!
So, today I will take the devil by the horns.

The rosewood of the rear handle had a tiny crack... they all do after two hundred years!

Full Story>>

Buckeye Iron Planes - Hardware Dealer's Magazine

 The Buckeye Saw Vise Co., No. 2050 West Fifty-fifth street, Cleveland, Ohio, are manufacturing the New Improved Buckeye Iron Planers, here illustrated.

In description of the recently made improvements in this line, the company says: “The cap plate in Buckeye Planes as heretofore made was stationary...

Full Story>>

Brace Yourselves! - part 4 by Jim Hendricks

The sun shone again in Tropical Kent today and the weather was so good..!

Me and ALFIE (aka "Lord Muck") got the loungers out, clamped the old French carvers vise to the patio handrail using various Heath Robinson techniques, grabbed the old Victorian brace, some tools and finishes, and attacked...

Full Story>>

Brace Yourselves! - part 3 by Jim Hendricks

I finally plucked up the courage to start shaping the early 19th century pad brace handle. I have to take accurate reference measurements and transferring these to the new handle.

The "chuck" must be fitted first, the reason being that only after fitting can you accurately line up the pad taper both laterally...

Full Story>>

James Ohlen & Sons Saw Mfg. Co. - Developing a Saw Business by the Advertising Manager

The stock should embrace, according to locality, such styles as Champion, Diamond, Perforated Lance and Tuttle Tooth cross cut saws, wide, narrow and one man blades, in a variety of gauges, classes of grinding, and teeth.  Circular saws could be included to advantage, large ...

Full Story>>

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Recent Articles


 

Latest Downloads


Brace Yourselves! - part 2 by Jim Hendricks

Brace Yourselves! - part 1 by Jim Hendricks

The Millers Falls Co. by a Special Correspondent, Hardware Dealers' Magazine

Standard Bench Vise by Cecil Rogers

A Woodworker’s Rose (brace) by J.  Stamper

Getting the Most from the Millers Falls MF 1 “Cigar Shave” by Jim Hendricks

Skills of the Sheffield Hand Forger by  Geoffrey Tweedale

Bird's Mouth & Wedge by Cecil Rogers

 

1891 - Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Co. Catalog No. 4

1916 - Woodworking: A Book of Tools, Materials, and Processes for a Handyman by Paul N. Hasluck

1909 - Malleable Cast Iron by S. Jones Parson

1874 - The Practical Metal -Worker's Assistant by Oliver Byrne

1919 - The Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Catalog No. 39 - Cleveland, Ohio

1912 - Morse Twist Drill & Machine Co.  Catalog- New Bedford, MA


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